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Is Baking a Cake a Physical Change?

Answer

No, baking a cake is not a physical change. Baking a cake is actually a chemical change. One way to remember the difference is that if you change just the shape of an object that is a physical change. A chemical change occurs when at least one new substance is formed.
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Q&A Related to "Is Baking a Cake a Physical Change?"
Baking a cake is a chemical change.
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baking is a chemical change. There is a decomposition of the ingredients, such as baking soda, which releases CO2 and forms the bubbles in the cake. Diamonds are "allotropes&
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Imagine learning about the physics of heat transfer by baking your own molten
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Let's start with making a cake. The baking soda or baking powder reacts with acid to produce CO2 gas for leavening Mixing the cake forms a protein called gluten from the proteins
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