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Is Starch a Reducing Sugar?

Answer

Starch is considered a reducing sugar. A reducing sugar is a sugar that has an aldehyde group or is capable of forming one in solution through isomerism. These are both characteristics in starch.
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1 Additional Answer
There are glycosidic bonds in starch that are also considered to be linkages. In fact it may be surprising to learn that there are different types of starch. The first type is called amylose and the other is amylopectin. And starch in either form the form of amylose and the amylopectin is not a reducing sugar at all. As well as those that are hydrolyzed and broken down such as polysaccharides are not reducing sugars as well.
Q&A Related to "Is Starch a Reducing Sugar?"
Starch, whether it's in the form of amylose or amylopectin, is not a reducing
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They are both carbohydrates. Disaccharides and Polysaccharides respectively.
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A reducing sugar is any sugar that, in alkaline solution, forms some aldehyde or ketone. This allows the sugar to act as a reducing agent for the body.
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1. Grind either wheat or corn kernels in the hammermill. 2. Transfer the ground grain into a container suitable for cooking and mix with two parts of water. 3. Heat up the mixture
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