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Origin of Phrase Something Rotten in Denmark?

Answer

The origin of the phrase 'Something is rotten in the state of Denmark' is Shakespeare's play Hamlet. The character Marcellus says this line to Horatio in Act 1, Scene 4 of Hamlet. It is often misquoted as 'Something is rotten in Denmark.'
Q&A Related to "Origin of Phrase Something Rotten in Denmark?"
This phrase originated in Shakespeare's
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Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. Horatio: He waxes desperate with imagination. Marcellus: Let's follow. 'Tis not fit thus to obey him. Horatio: Have after. To what issue
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This is a quote (or rather misquote) from Shakespeare's Hamlet. It is an allusion to the saying that when fish goes bad, the head goes bad first. Thus, the speaker is trying to say
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Bush. The quote is from the play "Hamlet" and the remark is made by Marcellus in Act I, scene iv. Marcellus is one of the guard along the battlements of the castle that
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