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Sclerotic Bone?

Answer

Sclerotic bone is bone that is responding to a lesion that is relatively slow growing. Bone responds to its environment by either retreating, which is losing bone, not growing any replacement bone, or creating new bone. If the environment in which the bone finds itself is a slower growing invader, the bone may have time to develop a growth called a sclerotic area around the offender. If the bone is being attacked by a fast growing invader, the bone will probably retreat.
Q&A Related to "Sclerotic Bone?"
A "sclerotic" lesion (also sometimes called a "blastic" lesion) is an abnormality of the bone that looks denser than normal on radiographs. Generally, this indicates
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200811...
This is not very common. In short, it is a portion of the left iliac bone (left hip bone) that for some reason is not getting good enough blood supply and is not healthy bone anymore
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_sclerotic_lesion...
Hello, We don't know why your husband needed a CT scan, - was this just part of routine follow-up, or does he have symptoms or pains somewhere? There seems to be some local disease
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201203...
This essentially is a cyst inside of the neck of the hip bone. The peripheral sclerotic area is the outside of this "cyst" and has a lot of calcium in it... thus it shows
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What+is+the+backbone+in+...
Explore this Topic
Sclerotic bone lesion can be seen through radiography. It is an abnormality that shows a particular area of the bone being larger than usual. This could indicate ...
A sclerotic lesions is a bone injury that develops slowly. This allows the bone to attempt to wall off the damaged bone tissue. Noncancerous lesions can be due ...
Some disorders, such as otitis media and Eustachian tube dysfunction, may cause the temporal bone to become sclerotic. A sclerotic temporal bone has the tendency ...
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