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Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day Meaning?

Answer

'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day,' is a line from Shakespeare's Sonnet 18. Sonnet 18 is often seen as the ultimate English love poem. The meaning of the poem is that everything beautiful eventually fades by chance or by natureâ€â&dbquo;¢s inevitable changes. In the line, 'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day,' he is comparing his love to a summer's day. He states that even though a beautiful summer day goes away, his love's summer (beautiful years) will never go away, but rather, as long as humans exist, and can see and read, fhe poem heâ€â&dbquo;¢s writing will live on, allowing the beloved to keep living as well.
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Q&A Related to "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day Meaning..."
In this sonnet the speaker is talking about how his love interest is more lovely than summer and how thee is immortal
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Lovely Sonnett by Shakespeare. The lines you pointed out mean: You will live forever in these lines that I have written. This writing itself confers immortality ... Wow! what a way
http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200...
Here is the whole poem: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all
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The final quatrain of the
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'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day,' is a line from Shakespeare's Sonnet 18. This line is one of the most famous lines of any of Shakespeare's sonnets. Sonnet ...
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The main metaphor of Shakespeare's Sonnet 18, which begins 'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?' is the comparison of the person to a summer day. Not surprisingly ...
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