What Is a Crystalloid?

Answer

A crystalloid is a substance that has the resemblance or features like those of a crystal. The word can also mean a tiny, mass of protein in a plant or a substance that forms a true solution rather than a colloid when dissolved.
1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: what is a crystalloid
crys·tal·loid
[kris-tl-oid]
NOUN
1.
a usually crystallizable substance that, when dissolved in a liquid, will diffuse readily through vegetable or animal membranes.
2.
Botany one of certain minute crystallike granules of protein, found in the tissues of various seeds.
ADJECTIVE
3.
resembling a crystal.
4.
of the nature of a crystalloid.
Source: Dictionary.com
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An isotonic crystalloid solution is typically used in volume replacement for the management of shock. The two most common fluids are normal saline and lactated ringer's.
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(krĭs'tə-loid') n. Chemistry. A substance that can be crystallized. Botany. Any of various minute crystallike particles consisting of protein and found in certain plant
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