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What Is a Pretrial Hearing in Criminal Case?

Answer

A Pretrial Hearing in a Criminal Case is a formal meeting held before a trial and is between the two parties in a case and the judge or a magistrate. In a criminal case, at such a hearing, one of the first things that may occur is the prosecutor will attempt to substantiate the validity of bringing a case before the court. Parties use this opportunity to meet with the judge to clarify legal issues and other matters that can be handled before the trial.
1 Additional Answer
A criminal case pre-trial hearing refers to a meeting of the parties to a case conducted prior to the actual trial. It may be held to help the court establish managerial control over the case and also to facilitate a settlement of the case.
Q&A Related to "What Is a Pretrial Hearing in Criminal Case"
Basically it is an administrative meeting between both attorneys in the case and the judge where the tentative plans for the conduct of the trial are laid out and an understanding
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_a_comprehensive_...
Many criminal cases end in a plea agreement in lieu of a trial. Negotiations between the defense and prosecution take time to complete, and courts use status hearings when the negotiations
http://www.ehow.com/facts_6860397_status-hearing-c...
An "exit pretrial" is a contextually inadequate description.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201306...
As long as you did not plea to a separate count or lesser charge, and your case was dismissed or a nolle prosequi was entered, you should be entitled to have the charges expunged
http://www.avvo.com/legal-answers/if-a-criminal-ca...
Explore this Topic
A Criminal Pretrial Hearing is a formal meeting between two parties in a case together with the magistrate or the judge. This type of hearing is generally used ...
A pretrial hearing in criminal court is usually an exchange of documents. This is when the judge will meet with both sides and set a trial date. ...
A pretrial hearing is a formal arrangement where the two parties involved in a court case and the judge or magistrate meet. A pretrial always follows an arraignment ...
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