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Why are specimens sometimes stained?

Answer

specimins are sometimes stained so that you can see them more clearly under a microscope. for example: if a specimin was clear or semi-transparent, then it would be stained with dye so that when you examine it you can see it, but if it wasn't stained
Q&A Related to "Why are specimens sometimes stained?"
For biological microscopy, thin sections are needed so that one can distinguish individual cells more easily. They are stained to show the individual details of the cells. Different
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Both processes use 2 stains. The Gram staining process uses crystal violet as the primary stain and safranin as the secondary stain. Acid-fast staining uses carbol fuchsin as the
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To see them better.
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The chemical that is used to make the specimen on a microscope visible is called a stain. The stain is made up of many different types of chemicals. The type of ...
The purpose of using stains and dyes when observing specimens with a compound microscope is to create contrast within the specimen. It enhances delineation and ...
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