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Why do ionic compounds conduct electricity in aqueous solution or when molten but do not conduct electricity when in the solid state?

Answer

the ionic compounds in aqueous solutions or in molten state separate into ions (i.e.positive and negative ions) and hence conduct electricity, which is not possible in case of solids. eg. NaCl dissociates into Na+ and Cl- and hence conducts
Q&A Related to "Why do ionic compounds conduct electricity in..."
ionic compounds are composed of cations (positive ions) and anions (negative ions) when it is in a molten state, these ions are free to move, and what happens is you get a current.
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Ionic compounds form crystal lattices in a solid state,so there are...
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In the states of Ohio , Michigan and Indiana. In those states they must conduct orchestras instead. Sorry, I couldn't resist a little more humor. I hope somebody really does answer
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